: ISL Definitions
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Analytical Groups of Countries

OECD Countries as per January 1st, 2012
Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Rep. of Korea, Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, UK and US.

EU Countries as per January 1st, 2012
Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and UK.

Developing Countries as per January 1st, 2012
Development status based on United Nations: World Economic Outlook April 2011.
Developing Countries include all flags except: OECD Countries; 10 Major Open Registry Countries; Countries in Transition (former USSR, Albania, Georgia, Mongolia, ex-Yugoslavia); and except Gibraltar, Israel, Monaco, Taiwan, Singapore and Hong Kong (SAR).

Major Open Registries
Countries permitting the registration of ships owned by non-residents. In general, ISL figures on open registry flags are restricted to the top ten major flags: Panama, Liberia, Bahamas, Malta, Marshall Islands, Cyprus, St. Vincent, Antigua & Barbuda, Vanuatu and Cayman Islands. (01.01.2012). ISL records (April issue) includes a seperate survey including the top 10 open registry countries.

CIS (Commenwealth of Independent States)
Countries : Comprise Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrghyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan. In the case of world fleet aggregates by flag and special fleet tables CIS-figures represent the former USSR fleet (rest fleet).

Tonnage Specification

Gross tonnage: (grt/gt) gt indicates that the ship has been measured in accordance with the requirements of the International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships 1969 and is derived by formula in accordance with those requirements.
Net tonnage (nrt/nt) : nt is derived by formula in accordance with the requirements of the International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships 1969.
Deadweight tonnage (dwt): Unit of measurement expressed in tonnes of the maximum permitted load of a ship (i.e. the weight of cargo, passengers, fuel, stores and crew) when loaded down to its maximum summer load line.
Compensated gross tonnage (cgt): Calculated by multiplying the tonnage of a ship by a coefficient, which is determined according to type and size of a particular ship. Cgt is used as an indicator of volume of work that is necessary to build a given ship.

Trade and Traffic Statistics

The definition used and the coverage of statistics presented vary considerably. In general, figures indicate metric units in all tables in which data are measured in weight, length or area.
Cargo tonnage There are two bases for charging the carriage of cargo: weight and capacity (measurement). If 1 ton (20 cwt) of a cargo occupies more than 40 cubic feet than capacity is usually the basis. Cargoes are selected to give the best combination of payable tons by weight or measurement.
Containers are usually measured in terms of twenty-foot equivalent units (TEU), being total length of containers in feet divided by 20.
Revenue ton (U.S.) A unit of cargo measurement found in all ports of the United States. It can not be defined in units either of weight or of space occupied by the cargo as it varies from port to port, from line to line, and from ship to ship, depending on the customs of the port and the nature of the cargo carried by the individual vessel. For any one port, however, and particularly for any one group of ships specializing in the same trade and carrying approximately the same kind of commodities the revenue ton represents a tangible unit of cargo measurement and is frequently used as the only means of expressing the total cargo of the ships.
All United States ships show on their manifests their total revenue tonnage, and very often they also indicate the total weight of the cargo in long tons.
Freight ton A unit of volume or weight used for quoting freight rates, in which 40 cu.ft. or 2,240 lbs. are taken as the equivalent of one ton. Also called stevedore ton. The measurement or weight is generally at ship's option. For freight purposes the term ton may also be applied to a number of hundered weights to be the equivalent of one ton and varying according to the goods.
Harbour ton 1000 kg or 1 cubic metre which ever yields the highest tonnage.

ISL Monthly Container Port Traffic Index

ISL’s Monthly Container Port Traffic Index is based on monthly container traffic of the world’s top container ports, which are published in the ISL Monthly Container Port Monitor (MCPM). In total, the ports reflected in the index handled approx. 386,4 mill TEU in 2012, equalling 69% of world container traffic. The monthly TEU volumes per port are available since 2000.

Ports currently covered are: Aden (Yemen), Algeciras - La Linea (Spain), Antwerp (Belgium), Ashdod (Israel), Balboa (Panama), Bandar Abbas (Iran), Bangkok (Thailand), Barcelona (Spain), Beirut (Lebanon), Bremen/Bremerhaven (Germany), Brisbane (Australia), Buenaventura (Colombia), Buenos Aires (Argentina), Busan (South Korea), Cape Town (South Africa), Charleston (USA), Chennai (India), Colombo (Sri Lanka), Dammam (Saudi Arabia), Dublin (Ireland), Durban (South Africa), Gdansk (Poland), Genoa (Italy), Guangzhou (China), Haifa (Isral), Hamburg (Germany), Helsinki (Finland), Hong Kong (China), Houston (USA), Inchon (South Korea), Itajai (Brazil), Jeddah (Saudi Arabia), Kaohsiung (Taiwan), Keelung (Taiwan), Kingston (Jamaica), Klaipeda (Lithuania), Kobe (Japan), Kotka (Finland), Kwangyang (South Korea), Laem Chabang (Thailand), Lazaro Cardenas (Mexico), Le Havre (France), Lisbon (Portugal), Long Beach (USA), Los Angeles (USA), Manzanillo (Mexico), Manzanillo (Panama), Marseilles (France), Melbourne (Australia), Mersin (Turkey), Montevideo (Uruguay), Montreal (Canada), Nagoya (Japan), New York/New Jersey (USA), Ngqura (South Africa), Nhava Sheva (India), Ningbo (China), Oakland (USA), Osaka (Japan), Paranagua (Brazil), Port of Virginia (USA), Qingdao (China), Rotterdam (Netherlands), San Antonio (USA), Santos (Brazil), Savannah (USA), Seattle (USA) Shanghai (China), Shenzhen (China), Singapore (Singapore), St. Petersburg (Russia), Sydney (Australia), Tacoma (USA) Taichung (Taiwan), Tallinn (Estonia), Tianjin (China), Tokyo (Japan), Valencia (Spain), Valparaiso (Chile), Vancouver (Canada), Veracruz (Mexico), Xiamen (China), Yokohama (Japan), Zeebrugge (Belgium)